Sunday, November 18, 2007

Newsflash: Cohabitation Bad for Kids!

Well, it looks like even the Sons of Perdition, that would be sociologists and social workers, have concluded that cohabitation is problematic for children. (OK, so I'm joking with that "Sons of Perdition" quip--kinda).

From the AP: "Many scholars and front-line caseworkers interviewed by The Associated Press see the abusive-boyfriend syndrome as part of a broader trend that deeply worries them. An ever-increasing share of America’s children grow up in homes without both biological parents, they say, and the risk of child abuse is markedly higher in nontraditional family structures."

Other findings cited in the article:

Children living in households with unrelated adults are nearly 50 times as likely to die of inflicted injuries as children living with two biological parents, according to a study of Missouri data published in the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2005.

Children living in stepfamilies or with single parents are at higher risk of physical or sexual assault than children living with two biological or adoptive parents, according to David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.

Girls whose parents divorce face significantly higher risk of sexual assault, whether they live with their mothers or fathers, according to research by Robin Wilson, a family law professor at Washington and Lee University.


To make a long story short, broken homes are places of disorder and instability where children become vulnerable on myriad levels.

"This is the dark underbelly of cohabitation," says UVA sociologist Brad Wilcox. "Cohabitation has become quite common, and most people think, 'What’s the harm?' The harm is we’re increasing a pattern of relationships that’s not good for children."

Wow, that's almost clear enough to pierce the brain of your average Darwinian, or the heart of your average feminist.

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